Good Friday

It’s Good Friday and I am blogging something I have blogged before. It’s the first time I have ever done that – repeated a post that is. I’m not repeating it because I think it’s so fantastic but because I started to write something and then realised that I had written it before. This either suggests that my writing is based on rock solid eternal truths that never move or that I lack imagination – you decide. I’m probably going to do the same on Easter Saturday as well if you want to come back and have a look. It’s full on religious in case you don’t come here for that (that is not an apology – just a statement) but here you go anyway…

I’m not really up for writing about the Crucifixion. I don’t have the skills. There have been countless poets and hymn writers who have got a lot closer than me. So I’m not going to do it. Write about the Crucifixion I mean. It’s too much for me and I am useless. I did want to say a couple of things though. 
Firstly, I’m really glad that “It’s Friday but Sunday’s coming” Well, obviously it is but it is still Friday. And, if it’s all the same to you, I would like to spend at least a portion of this day thinking on the horror that Jesus experienced. I’m not too keen on pretending that the darkness is never worth dwelling on for more than a millisecond. Partly because I think it does Jesus a dis-service but also, if we refuse to face the fact of a darkness full on, how can we identify with those who weep or mourn? Look how this darkness threw Peter. The night before when he had promised undying loyalty and love, Jesus had told him what would happen.

 “Don’t be so sure,” Jesus said. “This very night, before the rooster crows up the dawn, you will deny me three times.”

And that’s exactly what Peter did – a full throated, expletive filled denial in the end. And Peter was overcome. Overcome at his own weakness, and his inability to amount to anything after all the promising and the enthusiasm. He was so overcome that he completely forgot the rest of what Jesus had said to him. 

“But after I am raised up, I, your Shepherd, will go ahead of you, leading the way to Galilee.”

Jesus would come back, and would lead him and Peter would be restored. Peter was blinded to all this, so that on this day of days when Peter had said that he would be there for Jesus, he was nowhere to be found.

Later on, all this would be fulfilled of course but for now Peter was absent as his friend was tortured and killed. The fear had overcome him and he felt there was no way back. Good Friday reminds us that sometimes, for some, all seems lost and hope struggles to get a look in and it makes us go missing from God. People are having those times now as well. Hope seems lost, the darkness overwhelms, we are weak and afraid. Sometimes, as Christians we can be guilty of bellowing “Be Of Good Cheer!” at people (Christianese for “Buck Up”) and then leaving it at that. Today of all days is a time when we can at least, gently rub the back of someone’s hand and acknowledge the fact of the darkness for a time.

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2 Comments

  1. April 19, 2019 / 1:41 pm

    I’m only just beginning to face up to Good Friday (and I’m glad Sunday’s coming) A year or so ago I discovered an ancient poem called ‘The Dream of the Rood’, – the Crucifixion from the point of view of the Cross – how it was a tall proud tree, cut down to become an instrument of scandalous death. The description of Jesus as a warrior, facing the final battle (at this point the poem departs from the reality of Jesus’ last ignominious staggering to his death) but bear with it – the whole appalling event reframed as a glorious battle – has helped me edge a bit closer, raise my head a little, and take a few swift stares at ….Good Friday.

    • lesleyps91
      Author
      April 20, 2019 / 8:20 am

      I’m not very good at facing up to Good Friday. I comfort myself with the thought that Jesus always knew what was going to happen and submitted himself anyway. Makes me astonished and grateful in equal measure

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